How to write a resume



Writing a quality resume - 10 great tips

Writing a quality resume - 10 great tips

Every job search process begins with writing a resume that will catch the eye and convey professionalism and seriousness. Since this is a document that functions as your business card, it’s crucial to invest time and thought in writing it. But the more you think about it, the more complex and challenging the task becomes. How to write a resume? What should you write, and in what order?
 
The real answer is that there is no one way to write it. There is no uniform resume format to suit everyone without exception, since in each professional field different aspects must be emphasized. That’s why it’s important to exercise judgment and understand the meaning behind the things you choose to mention and the order of presentation. However, there is an acceptable structure and basic principles that are valid for most applicants, which you can read about in this article.

The resume builder
that takes you beyond

The resume builder
that takes you beyond

Tip # 1 - Put yourself in the employer’s shoes

Tip # 1 - Put yourself in the employer’s shoes

Throughout the resume writing process, try to think like the recruiter who’s going to read it. Ask yourself what you’d expect to see on a candidate’s resume? What would make you call them in for a job interview? What is fundamental and relevant for the organization or company you wish to work for?
 
In addition, consider the job you’re applying for. An employer looking for a graphic designer is likely to be favorably impressed with a specially-designed resume, while for a banking job this may be less appropriate.
Tip # 2 - General information

Tip # 2 - General information

The general information section will usually be at the top of the page or another prominent place. It lists all the basic details the employer needs to know: your full name, place of residence, and contact information like your phone number, email address, and more. You can also add your date of birth / age and marital status, but these are not compulsory.
Tip # 3 - What is a summary?

Tip # 3 - What is a summary?

Most recruiters do not read the full resume, but skim in search of key information. Therefore, a summary is recommended mainly for people with rich work experience or academic background, who wish to gather all the key details in one place to make sure the reader doesn’t miss any of them. The summary will usually appear at the top of the page, following the general information. It should consist of brief points with details such as relevant education, professional experience, professional achievements, and so on.
Tip # 4 - What comes first: education or work experience?

Tip # 4 - What comes first: education or work experience?

The standard is to put the education section before the professional experience section. However, this is where you should exercise judgment and ask yourself what is more relevant to the position.
 
For example: Consider a candidate named Alice, who applies as a sales manager at a car dealership. She holds a bachelor’s degree in social science and has previously worked as a shift manager at a call center. What do you think she should write first? What will increase her chances of being called in for a job interview? Now apply this to your own scenario.
 
If your education and work experience are both equally rich and relevant, choose the standard of writing your education first
נשמח שתצטרפו גם אתם לאלפי הלקוחות שבחרו בערכות ההכנה מבית ניב רווח!‬
קליק ונתקשר
Tip # 5 - Do keyword research

Tip # 5 - Do keyword research

Some, although not all, employers and placement agencies use automated screening systems that sort resumes in descending order of relevance, presenting only the most qualified candidates for placement. How can you increase the likelihood of your resume passing the filter? Read some want ads for the job you’re interested in, write down recurring words, and mark those that truly describe you. Integrate these keywords organically into the text, because your resume is ultimately intended for a human reader.
 
Another small tip: Since we don’t know precisely which words and terms the system looks for, it’s useful to write variations of the same expression on the resume. For example, if you’re applying for a job in UX, you should also write the term ”user experience design” on the resume.
Tip # 6 - Break your writing process into steps

Tip # 6 - Break your writing process into steps

This part of your resume will usually include your education and professional experience. These are particularly significant sections, as they contain the most important information for the recruiter, and will most likely receive the greatest attention. That’s why writing your work experience can be daunting and confusing at first. The goal is to write all the most relevant information as concisely as possible. In order to structure the information and pick out what’s important in it, we recommend breaking up the writing process into six steps:
 
1.    Write straight and without thinking a full paragraph about what you did at each workplace. List the roles you’ve played, the authority you had, the tools you used, the achievements you reached, the significant changes you led, and anything else that comes to mind.
 
2.    When all the information is in front of you, mark the most important things you’d like on your resume. Use your judgment to sort out the key details, especially those relevant to jobs in areas you’re interested in.
 
3.    Condense the information you’ve selected as most relevant into short, focused sentences.
 
4.    Arrange your jobs in reverse chronological order - first note your last place of work, then go back in the timeline.
 
5.    Pay special attention to achievements, and make sure to illustrate them with numerical examples.
 
6.    Naturally incorporate keywords that appear in the job’s want ad in order to pass the initial screening of the automatic placement system, if one is being used. As mentioned above, only the key expressions relevant to you should be used.
Tip # 7 – Write succinctly and in a standard language register

Tip # 7 – Write succinctly and in a standard language register

Write the content in short, concise, and easy-to-understand sentences. It is also advisable to write in a standard language register (i.e., level of formality) and to avoid poetic language or slang, since overly ornate or informal language may create an unwanted impression.
Tip # 8 - Avoid lying or embellishing reality

Tip # 8 - Avoid lying or embellishing reality

This tip may sound obvious, but many employers and placement professionals say that they often encounter inaccuracies in candidates’ resumes. Experienced employers and screeners, who encounter hundreds of resumes and interview dozens of people a day, are skilled at spotting inaccuracies on the part of the applicant, whether by asking questions, reading body language, etc. To avoid an embarrassing situation and not miss out on a potential job, you should write the truth.
 
As for “embellishing”, it’s usually quite easy to read between the lines and figure out your actual job definition, even if you put an impressive spin on it. This attempt to impress can easily backfire and create the opposite effect.
Tip # 9 - Final edit

Tip # 9 - Final edit

Well done, you’ve finished writing your resume! Now put the document aside and go back to reading it later. Letting the familiar text to rest allows you to look at it with fresh eyes. It’s critical to pay attention to the small details - misspellings, punctuation errors, and typos - and to consider some improved phrasing.
 
Another tip is to ask someone who hasn’t seen your resume to read it. They may provide you with additional perspective.
Tip # 10 - Don’t forget to update the information

Tip # 10 - Don’t forget to update the information

While you’ve invested considerable time and effort in writing your resume, this isn’t the end of the process, since a resume is a dynamic document that needs to be updated on a regular basis. Have you acquired further education? Completed trainings? Gained work experience? Moved? Changed your phone number? It’s important to update these details so as not to miss opportunities.
 
For example: Dan has lived in Philadelphia for years but decided to move to Boston when he got married. He applies for a job at a high-tech company near his new home and sends them an out-of-date resume. Although the ideal candidate by all measures, his chances of being called for a job interview are slim, due to the apparent distance between his residence and the workplace.
In conclusion

In conclusion

Your resume is the first impression you make and has a significant impact on your chances of being scheduled for a job interview. Writing it can be challenging, but if you follow the right process, you’ll create a document that shows you at your best and takes you one step further to finding a great job!